Search

✿Ring Around the Prose✿

Tag

fantasy

Review: Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban by J.K. Rowling

The book in one sentence: As Harry begins his third year at Hogwarts, he is warned about Sirius Black, one of Voldemort’s supporters who has broken out of Azkaban prison and is looking for revenge.

Rating:  Island collection

Long story long: Rereading the Harry Potter series has been both thrilling and nostalgic. It’s incredible how well the stories have held up over the past 20-something years, and how much of our lives they continue to influence (I mean, I still haven’t given up on my Hogwarts letter).

Prisoner of Azkaban is my favorite book so far because it marks a turning point in the seven-book series. It has some of the darkest material we’ve seen– what with an escaped convict, an execution, the return of Voldemort’s servant, and all the Dementors– and more importantly, it connects Harry’s life in Hogwarts to the larger wizarding world outside.

We get glimpses of this world in the first two books, but we start to understand it better in Prisoner of Azkaban. It introduces us to Cornelius Fudge, the Minister of Magic, and to the Dementors who guard Azkaban prison, both of whom become important figures in Harry’s story. We learn about Peter Pettigrew’s betrayal and the subsequent deaths of Lily and James Potter, and we meet Harry’s godfather, Sirius Black, who is one of the few people who intimately knew his parents.

Continue reading “Review: Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban by J.K. Rowling”

Review: Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets by J.K. Rowling

The book in two sentences: Harry is excited to start his second year at Hogwarts, but a mysterious, half-forgotten monster begins to terrorize the school. Harry, Ron, and Hermione attempt to stop it before Hogwarts is shut down for good.

Rating:  Island collection

Long story long: I realized after publishing my Sorcerer’s Stone review that that was less of a review and more of me just feeling good about re-entering the magical world (which is totally valid and I don’t feel bad about it at all). I could have talked about more literary things (like all the foreshadowing, character development, etc) but it felt nice to “turn off” the part of my brain that likes to analyze everything (everything) and let myself get swept up in the magic.

Chamber of Secrets, on the other hand, is a great place to start thinking more critically about the story: we’ve had a solid introduction to the wizarding world, gotten to know some of its characters, and we can now focus on the actual storytelling.

My amateur artistic rendering of Harry (who admittedly looks a lot older than 12 here)

Similar to Sorcerer’s Stone, Chamber of Secrets is inward-facing, having more to do with Hogwarts than the rest of the wizarding world. Like all books in the series, it gives Harry more insight into Voldemort’s identity and ethos. If the first book serves as an introduction to Voldemort, the second is where we start to see the real implications of his return. A memory of him is powerful enough to manipulate a student into petrifying her classmates…just imagine what Voldemort at the height of his powers could do.

Continue reading “Review: Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets by J.K. Rowling”

Review: Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone by J.K. Rowling

The book in two sentences: Harry Potter discovers that he’s no ordinary boy as he begins his training at the Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry. In his first year he will form deep friendships, make several enemies, and begin to find his place in the larger wizarding world.

Rating:  Island collection

Long story short: I’ve been wanting to reread this series for a while now, and since I won’t be starting school this September, I thought this would be a fitting time to imagine myself at Hogwarts instead.

I first read The Sorcerer’s Stone in fourth grade– I bought a copy through the Scholastic Book Fair because I liked the drawing of the boy on a broomstick– and it wasn’t long before I was entirely consumed by the wizarding world. I’m sure this story sounds familiar to many.

It took about a page and half of The Sorcerer’s Stone to transport me back to Harry’s world. I was clutching Archimedes (my Kindle) and sitting wide-eyed with my heart beating faster and faster. I actually got goosebumps. It was incredible, really, how quickly the same feelings I had the first time around– excitement, apprehension, wonder– came flooding back.

Continue reading “Review: Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone by J.K. Rowling”

Review: The Affair of the Mysterious Letter by Alexis Hall

The book in one sentence: It’s Sherlock Holmes in space, where Shaharazad Haas, a pansexual sorceress, and John Wyndham, a transgender ex-military officer, fight vampires, necromancers, and the occasional literary critic.

Rating:  Travel companion

Long story short: Overall, I really liked this re-imagining of Sherlock Holmes. The characters and some of the settings were similar enough to draw me in to the story, but new enough to make me keep reading.

My favorite things:

  • The queering of Holmes & Watson. I love seeing well-known characters exist outside of the confines of what was once imagined. I also liked that the story didn’t revolve around their queerness; they just exist as queer people.
  • The plot was so twisty. I loved the twists and turns in the story because they were both interesting and easy to follow.

My not-so-favorite things:

  • World-building could improve. Hall created an incredible universe in this story, but perhaps it was too ambitious for this one novel (this isn’t yet a series). He mentions a lot of things superficially, while I would have preferred him choosing a couple of things and giving us a deeper understanding. It’s certainly a self-contained story, so perhaps he wasn’t sure whether he would have the space later.
  • The ending came out of nowhere. After following Haas and Wyndham on an exciting chase, the entire mystery/puzzle comes to an end in about 10 pages and is a little disappointing. Given that literally anything is possible in this universe, it isn’t the type of story that you can try to solve as you go.

Have you read The Affair of the Mysterious Letter or other work by Alexis Hall? What did you think?

Review: The Paper Magician by Charlie N. Holmberg

The book in three sentences: After graduating from the Tagis Praff School for the Magically Inclined, Ceony begins her apprenticeship in paper magic with Magician Emery Thane. Her studies are interrupted when Thane’s heart is ripped from his body by a magician who specializes in blood magic. In order to save his life, Ceony gives chase and ends up in a place she never saw coming—Thane’s heart (literally).

Rating: 🏡  Left behind

Long story short (spoilers): Though I heard lots of positive things about the Paper Magician series, I am really disappointed in this book.

  • Characters are poorly written: I just didn’t care about any of them, there’s nothing special about them, they are so common; Ceony is 19 but acts like she’s 13; there is no chemistry between her and Thane; Ceony cooks, cleans, and even does Thane’s laundry though these are not part of her apprenticeship (your story has magic in it, and your female character still does all the emotional and physical labor?? That’s just unimaginative writing).
  • The plot is poorly developed: the first third of the book breezes through an introduction to Ceony and her world, and sets up a weak relationship between her and Thane, which results in an implausible love sub-plot (which is made more creepy by the fact that they are student and teacher and she is 19 and he is in his early 30s). The pacing in the last two-thirds of the book is equally jarring. Holmberg gives Ceony an inadequate and ill-defined backstory which meant nothing to me when it was revealed because of how little time we have to get to know (and care about) Ceony.
  • The world-building is non-existent: we hardly see what “magic” means in this world; the author breaks her own universe rules; there is no sense of wonder because the story is preoccupied with itself.

Not only does the book fail to meet many of my criteria for strong storytelling, but on top of than that, it also feels like a blatant rip-off of Avatar: The Last Airbender (the original animated series). People can cast spells with specific elements (including blood)? Though it was thought impossible, the protagonist in this book is somehow able to master other elements as well (that’s in book 3 of the series)? Um…no.

It’s safe to say that I won’t be reading the rest of the series, which is a bummer because I’m in the mood for alternatives to Harry Potter. If you have any suggestions, please leave them in the comments below!

wildwood

Update: books bought in the last three days!

The wonderful thing about having your boyfriend in town is that every day becomes a “treat yo’ self” kind of day, or in my case, a “treat yo’ shelf” kind of day.

Two cities, three days, four bookstores, and thirteen books later, I present to you: my recent loot.

Powell’s City of Books (Portland, OR)

On Sunday I spent a good chunk of time exploring the many lovely floors of Powell’s City of Books in Portland, Oregon (I would be lying if I said the distance to Powell’s didn’t factor in my decision to attend school in Washington).

This bookstore is fantastic in more ways than one, but I especially appreciated how they tagged books written by Writers of Color (WOC) throughout the store. Given my reading goals this year, it made it easier to head for the content I was really interested in.

Continue reading “Update: books bought in the last three days!”

A coffee and a giant

Making my way through book #2

Finished reading my first book of the year!

Rating: 🌴 Island collection

boy-snow-bird

Thoughts?

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: