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✿Ring Around the Prose✿

Month

September 2019

August 2019 book haul

I’m trying to diversify the types of posts I, er, post on here, and thought folks might be interested to know what kinds of books I’ve bought lately. Introducing: my monthly book haul blog!

For my reading challenge, I’m going through books I already own (i.e., didn’t buy in 2019) and haven’t read. It’s definitely helped curb the amount of books I buy, though not as much as my mom hoped it would.

In any case, this August I made five purchases:

  • The Moon Is a Harsh Mistress by Robert A. Heinlein (kindle)
  • Harry Potter series by J.K. Rowling (kindle)
  • Bolivar: The Liberator of Latin America by Robert Harvey (kindle)
  • Color Theory edited by Maya Gomez and Vreni Michelini-Castillo (paperback)
  • Triangulation by Masande Ntshanga (paperback)

The Moon is a Harsh Mistress by Robert A. Heinlein

One of my favorite finds this year has been BookBub, a free service that sends reading recommendations and deals on books and e-books. A few times a week I get emails about new releases from my favorite authors, and deals on Kindle books. I’ve discovered a number of exciting finds this way, and it’s one of my go-to places to purchase (mostly digital) books.

That’s how I found The Moon is a Harsh Mistress, a science-fiction novel about a revolution–on the moon! Written by a Hugo-winning American novelist, it follows the rebellion of a former penal colony and explores the relationship between them and the controlling authority on Earth.

Continue reading “August 2019 book haul”

Review: Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban by J.K. Rowling

The book in one sentence: As Harry begins his third year at Hogwarts, he is warned about Sirius Black, one of Voldemort’s supporters who has broken out of Azkaban prison and is looking for revenge.

Rating:  Island collection

Long story long: Rereading the Harry Potter series has been both thrilling and nostalgic. It’s incredible how well the stories have held up over the past 20-something years, and how much of our lives they continue to influence (I mean, I still haven’t given up on my Hogwarts letter).

Prisoner of Azkaban is my favorite book so far because it marks a turning point in the seven-book series. It has some of the darkest material we’ve seen– what with an escaped convict, an execution, the return of Voldemort’s servant, and all the Dementors– and more importantly, it connects Harry’s life in Hogwarts to the larger wizarding world outside.

We get glimpses of this world in the first two books, but we start to understand it better in Prisoner of Azkaban. It introduces us to Cornelius Fudge, the Minister of Magic, and to the Dementors who guard Azkaban prison, both of whom become important figures in Harry’s story. We learn about Peter Pettigrew’s betrayal and the subsequent deaths of Lily and James Potter, and we meet Harry’s godfather, Sirius Black, who is one of the few people who intimately knew his parents.

Continue reading “Review: Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban by J.K. Rowling”

Review: Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets by J.K. Rowling

The book in two sentences: Harry is excited to start his second year at Hogwarts, but a mysterious, half-forgotten monster begins to terrorize the school. Harry, Ron, and Hermione attempt to stop it before Hogwarts is shut down for good.

Rating:  Island collection

Long story long: I realized after publishing my Sorcerer’s Stone review that that was less of a review and more of me just feeling good about re-entering the magical world (which is totally valid and I don’t feel bad about it at all). I could have talked about more literary things (like all the foreshadowing, character development, etc) but it felt nice to “turn off” the part of my brain that likes to analyze everything (everything) and let myself get swept up in the magic.

Chamber of Secrets, on the other hand, is a great place to start thinking more critically about the story: we’ve had a solid introduction to the wizarding world, gotten to know some of its characters, and we can now focus on the actual storytelling.

My amateur artistic rendering of Harry (who admittedly looks a lot older than 12 here)

Similar to Sorcerer’s Stone, Chamber of Secrets is inward-facing, having more to do with Hogwarts than the rest of the wizarding world. Like all books in the series, it gives Harry more insight into Voldemort’s identity and ethos. If the first book serves as an introduction to Voldemort, the second is where we start to see the real implications of his return. A memory of him is powerful enough to manipulate a student into petrifying her classmates…just imagine what Voldemort at the height of his powers could do.

Continue reading “Review: Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets by J.K. Rowling”

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