Brief synopsis (back of the book): A powerful novel of a woman’s self-definition and a daring literary feat in which a Lebanese-American woman, Sarah Nour El-Din (named after the “divine” Sarah Bernhardt because of her red hair) tells her story. Chapter after Chapter, she throws out her opening and begins again.

The hilarity and tragedy of family life, the dark absurdity of cultural conflict, the horrors of rape and war, the pathos of broken love affairs, and the general confusion of the modern world–Sarah survives it all. Anyway, she’s willing to start over one more time.

Rating:🌴 Island collection

Long story short (no spoilers): I had a really great time reading this novel. I enjoyed both the protagonist—such a wonderfully complex human!—and the writing style, but what intrigued me the most was that it was written entirely in first chapters. Yep, you read that right: each chapter is literally Chapter 1.

This creative narrative choice worked really well. At first I thought it would be slow and dull, because I assumed each part would begin with the same information, and it did for a little bit, but it quickly expanded to become a rather vibrant and rich story. Part of that was due to a “layering” of details: each chapter had certain central themes in common, but always added slightly new information or veered off in another direction, so it felt like you were getting to know Sarah more organically than if the chapters progressed normally.

Another thing that added to the charm was that the chapters were not in chronological order, nor were they always linear. And then, about a quarter of the way through, the chapters began to pick up different tones and even writing styles, which was fascinating.

This was my first introduction to Rabih Alameddine, and I’ll definitely be on the lookout for more of his work. Have you read I, the Divine or any other novels by this author? What did you think?

 

 

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